Saturday, July 30, 2005

how can i find all duplicate values within an array?

FAQTs - Knowledge Base - View Entry - how can i find all duplicate values within an array?

how can i find all duplicate values within an array?
Sep 10th, 2004 13:29

Gavin Kistner, Jean-Bernard Valentaten, Periklis a





Well, there is more than one way to achieve this.
The easiest one is to walk the array position by position with two
loops:

for (var i=0; i{
for (var j=i+1; j {
if (myArray[i] == myArray[j])
myArray[j] = '';
}
}

This will do the job, but is very inefficient (especially with large
arrays), since a lot of comparisons are made. One might start to
optimize this code, but believe me, a slow algorithm will always stay
slow, no matter how much you optimize it.
The better way is to sort the array and then have a loop walk it once:

myArray.sort();

for (var i=0; i{
if (myArray[i] == myArray[i+1])
myArray[i+1] = '';
}

Note that the above solution does not account for objects stored in
the array which may be technically different (== computes to false)
but trivially the same. For example:

var myArray = [
{ name:'Gavin', age:31 },
{ name:'Lisa', age:30 },
{ name:'Gavin', age:23 },
{ name:'Gavin', age:31 }
];

In the above, technically
myArray[0] != myArray[3]
even though you know it is. For something like this you can write your
own comparison function:

Array.prototype.removeDuplicates = function( customCompare ){
if ( customCompare ){
this.sort(customCompare);
for (var i=0; i<(this.length-1); i++)
{
if ( !customCompare(this[i],this[i+1]) ){
this.splice( (i--)+1, 1 );
}
}
}else{
this.sort();
for (var i=0; i<(this.length-1); i++)
{
if (this[i]==this[i+1]){
this.splice( (i--)+1, 1 );
}
}
}
return this;
}


You would call the above passing in the same sort of custom comparison
function as the myArray.sort() method takes:

myArray.removeDuplicates( function(a,b){
return a.nameb.name ? 1 :
a.age b.age ? 1 : 0;
} );

.NET Questions Joel

.NET Questions

Joel on Software - The Joel Test: 12 Steps to Better Code

Joel on Software - The Joel Test: 12 Steps to Better Code

Dev Bistro: Tech Jobs Posted Daily

Dev Bistro: Tech Jobs Posted Daily

Wednesday, July 27, 2005

Have we lost the SharePoint vision?

Have we lost the SharePoint vision?

Access 2003 Technical Articles

Technical Articles

Office Developer Center: Using Excel 2003 to Manage Project Sites with Windows SharePoint Services 2003

Office Developer Center: Using Excel 2003 to Manage Project Sites with Windows SharePoint Services 2003

Dan Fernandez's Blog

Dan Fernandez's Blog

Eric Gunnerson's C# Compendium

Eric Gunnerson's C# Compendium

CLR Design Choices

CLR Design Choices

Resources - Testing Tools for Developing Accessible Web Sites :: WATS.ca

Resources - Testing Tools for Developing Accessible Web Sites :: WATS.ca

Internet Explorer 7: Now in beta testing for developers

Internet Explorer 7: Now in beta testing for developers

Microsoft Windows Vista

Microsoft Windows Vista

Peli's Blog (Jonathan de Halleux) blog

Peli's Blog (Jonathan de Halleux)

Logical Functional Model of a multi role application

Test it 'till it hurts

C# Design Patterns

Design Patterns

Tuesday, July 26, 2005

MSDN Webcast: Testing Methodologies for Automated Web Application Vulnerability Scanners (Level 200)

Microsoft SQL Server 2005 E-Learning

Microsoft SQL Server 2005 E-Learning

Data Access and Storage Developer Center: Data Webcasts

Data Access and Storage Developer Center: Data Webcasts

Data Access and Storage Developer Center: Part 6: Efficiently Representing Sets

Data Access and Storage Developer Center: Part 6: Efficiently Representing Sets: "An Extensive Examination of Data Structures Using C# 2.0"

What OLE Is Really About?

Technical Articles

XML Options in Microsoft SQL Server 2005

Welcome to the MSDN Library

SQL Server: XML To The Max: Get More Power Out Of Your SQL Server -- TechNet Magazine, Spring 2005

SQL Server: XML To The Max: Get More Power Out Of Your SQL Server -- TechNet Magazine, Spring 2005

Jelle Druyts - DataSets Are Not Evil

Jelle Druyts - DataSets Are Not Evil

Cutting Edge: DataSets vs. Collections -- MSDN Magazine, August 2005

Cutting Edge: DataSets vs. Collections -- MSDN Magazine, August 2005: "Typed DataSet—Good and Bad

Aware of the logical limitations of the DataSet object, Microsoft also introduced the typed DataSet—a class that derives from DataSet and inherits all the members of a DataSet. In addition, a typed DataSet provides strongly typed members to access tables and columns by name, instead of using generic collection-based methods. This is beneficial for at least two reasons. First, it improves the overall readability of the code and provides significant help from the Visual Studio 2005 IDE through IntelliSense® and automatic code completion. Second, typed DataSets let you distinguish one table from the next using different objects to render each. Table Employees, for example, will be a different object from table Customers. In this way, type mismatch errors are caught at compile time rather than during execution.

Typed DataSets are still data containers, they're just a bit less generic and have a little more information about the data they contain. They can still hold any data, but you get some specialized members to speed up any work you need to do on a few particular types of data.

Typed DataSets include the same serialization algorithm as DataSets, but because they're derived classes it's easier to extend them further with manually written code to improve the serialization mechanism. For example, your typed DataSet can reimplement the ISerializable interface to reduce or compress the amount of data being moved if you find out that in the particular context in which it operates the XML-based serialization algorithm is too heavy. Speaking of this, let me add a brief remark. As Figure 1 shows, the XML algorithm performance is not so bad when you're moving only a few hundred rows. Sure, each system has its own size and data, but if you realize you're moving thousands of rows across the layers, spend some time making sure you're doing it right. It m"

Test Run: Lightweight UI Test Automation for ASP.NET Web Apps -- MSDN Magazine, April 2005

Test Run: Lightweight UI Test Automation for ASP.NET Web Apps -- MSDN Magazine, April 2005

Monday, July 25, 2005

Joel on Software - Advice for Computer Science College Students

Joel on Software - Advice for Computer Science College Students

Certified Software Tester CSTE Certification

Software Certifications

Microsoft Visual Studio 2005 Team System (VSTS)

Microsoft Visual Studio 2005 Team System (VSTS)

Tracking Bugs

Tracking Bugs

Alex Leukhin asked some excellent questions about my last post on Testing ASP.NET 2.0 and Visual Web Developer:



“Can you clarify - how issues are assigned to developers? Does a tester assign issues directly to members of development team, or they assign them to PM who will assign those issues to team members? Or issues are automatically distributed between development groups based on member's workload? What kind of software do you use for issue tracking?”

Is there a way to create work items without using the IDE Team Explorer?

Team System GGGGGrrrrrr about Work Items!

TechED 2005 SharePoint Sessions

TechED 2005 SharePoint Sessions

Sunday, July 24, 2005

Microsoft Excel Integration of Work Items in Team Foundation

Community Server :: File Galleries

LAME Ain't an MP3 Encoder - Links

LAME Ain't an MP3 Encoder - Links

Rob Caron's Blog - A Team System Nexus : Team Foundation Server, Windows SharePoint Services and Active Directory

Rob Caron's Blog - A Team System Nexus : Team Foundation Server, Windows SharePoint Services and Active Directory: "Team Foundation Server, Windows SharePoint Services and Active Directory"

Brian A White's Blog Work Item Tracking

Brian A White's Blog

kkelly's WebLog Program Manager, Work Item Tracking, Team Foundation Server

kkelly's WebLog

Team Development & Collaboration with Team System

Team Development & Collaboration with Team System

Sharepoint Team Site and Work Item reporting

Visual Studio Team System

The SharePoint home page for your project is the perfect tool for these individuals. From this site they are able to access the current status of the project, review the number and severity of bugs, and access the project documentation. In addition, various reports will be available. These will include reports for outstanding work items, outstanding bug reports, test results, and many others. This added visibility should provide a much greater insight into the development process than what has previously been available.

Before I finish, I should make one point about extensibility. For organizations that have existing development processes already in place, Team System was designed to support customization. Team System was also designed with the idea that third-party companies would be able to integrate and extend it. Borland has already announced that they will be delivering a version of their CaliberRM requirements management tool that integrates with Team System. This fills a gap in the Microsoft product suite. If Team System doesn't meet all of your needs, however, be sure to look for the appropriate tools that integrate with and extend it.

Saturday, July 23, 2005

Visual Studio 2005 Team System: Software Project Management

Visual Studio Team System

Building Work Item Lists in Microsoft Excel

Project managers typically use Microsoft Excel to store lists of issues, work items, or even to schedule work. The Visual Studio Project Management tools provide a Microsoft Excel add-in that ties a list object in the spreadsheet to the work item database. The work item database is a where all work items such as bugs, risks, and tasks are stored.

Consider a scenario where a project manager creates a spreadsheet that includes the top 10 risks. As the project manager makes changes to the assignment, priority, and other fields on those risks, team members receive the updated information in their work item queues. The project manager no longer needs to query for status on the work item, but can pull that information directly from the work item database into the spreadsheet.

There are two ways to create a work item list. From the Portfolio Explorer (a view of the project in the Visual Studio IDE) a project manager can select a work item query or the documents node and create a new data-bound spreadsheet. The new spreadsheet will contain a work item list that is populated with the data from the query.

The project manager can also create a work item list from within Excel using the add-in to select a project and import work items.

Microsoft Technical Forums

Microsoft Technical Forums

Fry's Electronics advertisement

NWsource: Seattle shopping, stores, newspaper ads, sales and deals

Friday, July 22, 2005

Cross-browser/Cross-platform Table

Cross-browser/Cross-platform Table

Build a Cross-Platform Testing Station in Mac OS: A List Apart

Build a Cross-Platform Testing Station in Mac OS: A List Apart

Download details: Exchange Server GUIDGen

Download details: Exchange Server GUIDGen

Firefox Extension Tutorial — Business Logs

Firefox Extension Tutorial — Business Logs

Quality Tree Software, Inc. - Web Links

Quality Tree Software, Inc. - Web Links

Automation Junkies / Tools / Rational Visual Test

Automation Junkies / Tools / Rational Visual Test

IBM Academic Initiative - Curriculum and Courseware

IBM Academic Initiative - Curriculum and Courseware

sites for Open courseware

Web services programming tips and tricks: Stress testing Web services

Web services programming tips and tricks: Stress testing Web services

Build it or Buy it? Defect Management tool

biobi.pdf (application/pdf Object)

Google AdWords: Keyword Tool

Google AdWords: Keyword Tool

Summary Site-Report - turn your web site into a success

Summary Site-Report - turn your web site into a success

STC Usability Interface - Newsletter Home Page

STC Usability Interface - Newsletter Home Page

Ten Guidelines for User-Centered Web Design

Ten Guidelines for User-Centered Web Design

Microsoft Learning Resources

Microsoft Learning Resources

Inside Workflow and EAI

Inside Workflow and EAI

Monday, July 18, 2005

SpySmith from Quality Forge

SpySmith from Quality Forge

JOT: Journal of Object Technology - Specifying Good Requirements

Abstract

Many of the characteristics of properly specified requirements have been well known for many years, at least among professional requirements engineers. Yet most requirements specifications seen today in industry still include many poor-quality requirements. Far too many requirements are ambiguous, incomplete, inconsistent, incorrect, infeasible, unusable, and/or not verifiable (e.g., not testable). To combat this sad state of affairs, this column provides a questionnaire that can be used when specifying and technically evaluating requirements.

When I enter text in a text field, or interact with something on a page, there is a JavaScript?

Wiki: FrequentQuestions: "Q. When I enter text in a text field, or interact with something on a page, there is a JavaScript? event that is triggered by mouse movements. How do I get Watir to trigger these events?

A. If the tag contains a JavaScript? call, you can use the 'fire_event' method to trigger it. ex. onchange=doThis() or onmouseup=clearForm()
To trigger a text field named 'my_field' with an onchange event we would do this with Watir:
ie.text_field(:name, 'my_field').fire_event('onchange')"

Are Your Requirements Complete?

Abstract

Good requirements have several useful properties, such as being consistent, necessary, and unambiguous. Another essential characteristic that is almost always listed is that ‘requirements should be complete.’ But just what does completeness mean, and how should you ensure that your requirements are complete? In this column, we will begin to address these two questions by looking at (1) the importance of requirements completeness, (2) the completeness of requirements models, (3) the completeness of various types of individual requirements, and (4) the completeness of requirements metadata. In next issue’s column, we will continue by addressing (5) the completeness of requirements repositories, (6) the completeness of requirements documents derived from such repositories of requirements, (7) the completeness of sets of requirements documents, (8) the completeness of requirements baselines, and finally (9) determining how complete is complete enough when using an incremental and iterative development cycle.

Firesmith OPEN Process Framework (OPF) Website

Firesmith OPEN Process Framework (OPF) Website

The Code Project - Convert MP3, MPEG, AVI to Windows Media Formats - Multimedia

The Code Project - Convert MP3, MPEG, AVI to Windows Media Formats - Multimedia

Sunday, July 17, 2005

Automation Testing Articles

Testing Articles

Automated Security Funcational Testing - Publications page

Automated Security Funcational Testing - Publications page

Model-based Approach to Security Test Automation

Security functional testing is a costly activity typically
performed by security evaluation laboratories. These
laboratories have struggled to keep pace with increasing
demand to test numerous product variations. This paper
summarizes the results of applying a model-based
approach to automate security functional testing. The
approach involves developing models of security function
specifications (SFS) as the basis for automatic test vector
and test driver generation. In the application, security
properties were modeled and the resulting tests were
executed against Oracle and Interbase database engines
through a fully automated process. The findings indicate
the approach, proven successful in a variety of other
application domains, provides a promising approach to
security functional testing.

Introduction:


Software security is a software quality issue that continues
to grow in importance as software systems manage continually
increasing amounts of critical corporate and personal
information. The use of the Internet to manage and exchange
this data has heightened the need for secure software
architectures, especially Internet-based architectures. At the
same time, shortened development and deployment cycles for
software make it difficult to conduct adequate security
functional testing to verify whether software systems exhibit
the expected security behavior.

How do you know when you are done testing?

Check out the link to pdf.

homebrew_test_automation

homebrew_test_automation

Friday, July 15, 2005

Testing: Article info : Do You Want Fries With That Test?

Testing: Article info : Do You Want Fries With That Test?: "Do You Want Fries With That Test?
Test Connection

By Michael Bolton
May 1, 2005

Summary: Connect with an expert to learn how to work smarter and learn new ways to uncover more defects. In this issue, Michael Bolton dishes out commentary on why testers who master skills instead of memorizing techniques are relished in the software industry.




In my early 20s, I decided that if I were to be a well-rounded young man (and appeal to young women), a good start would be for me to learn to cook. Like most young men, I didn't want to spend a lot of time and effort every time I walked into the kitchen, but I still wanted to impress. Above all, I wanted to learn skills so I could deal with whatever the situation required: people with different tastes and special dietary needs, the bachelor’s meager refrigerator, and the unexplored territory of someone else’s kitchen. One of my standard approaches to learning is to head for the bookstore and browse. I spotted a copy of The 60-Minute Gourmet, by Pierre Franey. Perfect, I thought.

In the introduction, M. Franey described his philosophy of cooking. He stressed speed and simplicity, which surprised me. I had assumed that all French cooking was elaborate and complex, but true to its title, each recipe required an hour or less to prepare. He also recommended some tools, emphasizing important characteristics and qualities—a heavy saucepan and a balanced, substantial chef’s knife. He included a modest list of basic foodstuffs and seasonings to keep on hand. He recommended gathering the tools and measuring out the ingredients before turning on the heat, and he advised continuously tasting the work in progress.

Each recipe was the centerpiece of a meal; each included an accompanying side dish that was sim"

Website Testing

Website Testing

The Automated Testing Lifecycle Methodology (ATLM)

Articles

Lessons in Test Automation: A Manager's Guide to Avoiding Pitfalls When Automating Testing

Articles

Gathering Performance Information While Executing Everyday Automated Tests

Articles: "puts 'Step 3: submit the search form.' beginTime = Time.now $ie.form(:index, '1').submit #submitting first form found in the page. endTime = Time.now #Log the time for the search timeSpreadsheet.puts executionEnvironment + ',Time to execute search,' + (endTime - beginTime).to_s"

Systir - System Testing In Ruby at atomicobject.com

Systir - System Testing In Ruby at atomicobject.com

adaptive path » essay archives

adaptive path » essay archives

Ajax.NET - The free library for .NET (C#)

Ajax.NET - The free library for .NET (C#)

AutoTestFlash For testing Flash applications.

AutoTestFlash

Tuesday, July 12, 2005

"I want to use 'divide by zero' to indicate a physically impossible task. What does the phrase actually mean?

Math Forum: Ask Dr. Math FAQ: Dividing by Zero: "I want to use 'divide by zero' to indicate a physically impossible task. What does the phrase actually mean?
Well, division by zero is not so much 'physically impossible' as it is 'in violation of mathematical axioms.' You see, the phrase 'physically impossible' implies a task that cannot be done, no matter the amount of exertion of effort, whereas the phrase 'in violation of mathematical axioms' means that the operation contradicts certain basic assumptions regarding the system in question.
Numbers have certain properties and rules; for instance, we say that adding, subtracting, multiplying, and dividing two numbers will give another number. Subtraction is the opposite of addition, as division is the opposite of multiplication. Any number multiplied by zero gives zero.
There are several of these basic rules, called axioms, and in particular, the kinds of numbers we are familiar with, and do basic arithmetic with, form what mathematicians call a 'field.' In this field, these rules I have described are called 'field axioms.' (There are others as well.)
In essence, the field axioms lay down a set of rules, i.e., basic assumptions, about how to put numbers together to get other numbers. And so, division by zero can be shown to contradict these rules (this proof is usually taught in beginning algebra classes.)
Technically speaking, division by 0 is not impossible; rather, it is contradictory to assumption. As such, we disallow it as a valid operation on numbers. 'Physically impossible' is a more fitting description of a phenomenon, such as the creation of a perpetual motion machine, or the decrease in entropy of a closed system. Division by 0 is not so much a phenomenon as it is a supposed construction, which is provably contradictory t"

cisp_PCI_Data_Security_Standard.pdf (application/pdf Object)

cisp_PCI_Data_Security_Standard.pdf (application/pdf Object)

Using Win32::GuiTest

Using Win32::GuiTest

Using Win32::GuiTest

Using Win32::GuiTest

Monday, July 11, 2005

Black box software testing: A course by Cem Kaner & James Bach

Black box software testing: A course by Cem Kaner & James Bach

Software Test & Performance Magazine

Software Test & Performance

Improving the Maintainability of Automated Test Suites

Essential ADO.NET: XML and Data Access Integration

Articles

Learn how ADO.NET not only supports relational data through the data provider, DataSet, and Adapter architecture, but also adds support for all types of nonrelational data through its integration with XML.

A Guide to Building Secure Web Applications

A Guide to Building Secure Web Applications

Attacks on the System

Attacks on the System

What is ADO.NET?

ONLamp.com: Rolling with Ruby on Rails

ONLamp.com: Rolling with Ruby on Rails

Work with an XML file as if it was a database table

Work with an XML file as if it was a database table

There is a cool XML database client (Open-Source ADO.NET XML Provider -- WilsonXmlDbClient v1.0)written by Paul Wilson that allows you to work directly with a well formed XML file as if it was a database. Here we will use this XML database client to code some simple examples using 'SELECT', 'INSERT', 'UPDATE', and 'DELETE' SQL commands directly against an XML file. To present and edit data we are going to use a DataList server control. I liked the article - Use the DataList Control to Present and Edit Data..., and I wanted to use it in this example. Also, we are going to use a couple of nifty objects like ViewState and SessionState. ViewState is used to track the value between post backs and SessionState is used to store data specific to a single client within a Web application on the server.

A Guide to Testing the Rails | Hieraki

A Guide to Testing the Rails | Hieraki

Sunday, July 10, 2005

ASP.NET : ASP.NET Training

ASP.NET : ASP.NET Training: "Are you looking to learn to create ASP.NET Web applications with Visual Studio.NET? If so now is your chance to get 17 hours of hands-on ASP.NET training for free from Microsoft Learning.
For a limited time only, Microsoft Learning is offering Developing Microsoft ASP.NET Web Applications with Visual Studio.NET, a 17-hour self-paced online training course, for free ($349.00 value).
Click here to get started and enter promotion code 8317-MSDN-6595
Hurry, this offer is only valid for a limited time!"

Thursday, July 07, 2005

Fundamental Approaches to Test Automation - Approaches Providing a Basis For Effective Software Test Automation - SQC Technology Ltd

Fundamental Approaches to Test Automation - Approaches Providing a Basis For Effective Software Test Automation - SQC Technology Ltd

White Paper: TestPlan Driven Automated Testing

White Paper: TestPlan Driven Automated Testing

Data Driven Test Automation Frameworks

Data Driven Test Automation Frameworks

Improving the Maintainability of Automated Test Suites. Software testing. Software quality. Los Altos Workshop on Software Testing. LAWST.

Improving the Maintainability of Automated Test Suites. Software testing. Software quality. Los Altos Workshop on Software Testing. LAWST.

StickyMinds.com : Article info : When Should a Test Be Automated?

StickyMinds.com : Article info : When Should a Test Be Automated?

Seven Steps to Test Automation Success

Seven Steps to Test Automation Success

StickyMinds.com : Column info : Three Keys to Test Automation

StickyMinds.com : Column info : Three Keys to Test Automation

Introduction to non functional testing

Introduction to non functional testing

Cookbook for using SQL Server DTS 2000 with .NET

DTS Cookbook for .NET

Tracking Database Changes Using History Tables (Part 2) - Knowledge Discovery Keys

Tracking Database Changes Using History Tables (Part 2) - Knowledge Discovery Keys

Eric Kepes : Using SQL Express 2005 from VS 2003

Eric Kepes : Using SQL Express 2005 from VS 2003: "Using SQL Express 2005 from VS 2003"

T-SQL Enhancements in SQL Server 2005

Articles

sqlexpress's WebLog

sqlexpress's WebLog


SQL Server service fails to start

In some cases on a non-English OS, the SQL Server Service will fail to start. The workaround for this problem is to run the service as Local System or a Domain user account and not the Network Service Account (which is set if you do a default installation)

posted Tuesday, May 24, 2005 5:28 PM by sqlexpress with 0 Comments
How to: Configure Express to accept remote connections

Some people have been having issues when trying to make remote connections
to SQL Express. This document will hopefully clarify most of the issues
around remote connections.

First, networking protocols are disabled by default in SQL Server Express.
Thus, if someone simply installs Express and chooses all the defaults, SQL
Server Express will only be able to have connections originating on the
local machine where SQL Server is installed.

To enable SQL Server Express to accept remote connections we need to perform
the following steps:

STEP 1: Enabling TCP/IP

First we must tell SQL Server Express to listen on TCP/IP, to do this
perform the following steps:

1. Launch the SQL Server Configuration Manager from the "Microsoft SQL
Server 2005 CTP" Program menu
2. Click on the "Protocols for SQLEXPRESS" node,
3. Right click on "TCP/IP" in the list of Protocols and choose, "Enable"

STEP 2: To Browse or not to Browse

Next, we have to determine if we want the SQL Browser service to be running
or not. The benefit of having this service run is that users connecting
remotely do not have to specify the port in the connection string. Note: It
is a security best practice to not run the SQLBrowser service as it reduces
the attack surface area by eliminating the need to listen on an udp port.

OPTION A: If you want to always specify a TCP port when connecting (Not
using SQL Browser service) perform the following steps else skip these
steps:

1. Launch the SQL Server Configuration Manager from the "Microsoft SQL
Server 2005 CTP" Program menu

2. Click on the "Protocols for SQLEXPRESS" node

3. Click on the "TCP/IP" child node

4. You will notice an entry on the right panel for "IPAll", right click
on this and select, "Properties"

5. Clear out the value for "TCP Dynamic Ports"

6. Give a TcpPort number to use when making remote connections, for
purposes of this example lets choose, "2301"


At this point you should restart the SQL Server Express service. At this
point you will be able to connect remotely to SQL Express. A way I like to
check the connection is my using SQLCMD from a remote machine and connecting
like this:

SQLCMD -E -S YourServer\SQLEXPRESS,2301

The "," in the server name tells SQCMD it's a port.

So you've tried this and still get an error. Take a look at Step 3, this
should address the remaining issue.

OPTION B: If you want to use SQL Browser service perform these steps:

Note:
You will need to make this registry key change if you are using the April
CTP or earlier versions:

To enable sqlbrowser service to listen on the port 1434, the following
registry key must be set to 1

HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Microsoft SQL Server\90\SQL
Browser\Ssrplistener

Next, restart the sqlbrowser service.

1. Start the SQL Browser Service

STEP 3: Firewall..?

At this point you should be able to remotely connect. If you still
can't chances are you have a firewall configured on the computer where SQL
Express is running. The instructions below are for Windows XP SP2's
firewall settings.

To enable the firewall to allow SQL Server Express traffic:

1. Launch the Windows Firewall configuration tool from the control
panel.

2. Click the Exceptions Tab

3. Click the "Add Programs." button and select "sqlservr.exe" from the
location where you install SQL Server Express


You should be able to remotely connect. Note, you can get more restrictive
by just specifying the port number that will be allowed (used best when
configured with Option A).

Note: If you chose to use the SQL Browser service, you must also add
sqlbrowser service executable to the exception list as it listens on udp
port 1434.

Side-by-Side .NET Execution Overview

Side-by-Side Execution Overview

.NET Framework Developer Center: Compatibility Testing Scenarios

.NET Framework Developer Center: Compatibility Testing Scenarios

Migrating to Visual Studio.NET 2003: A Developer Perspective

Migrating to Visual Studio.NET 2003: A Developer Perspective

Switching Target Frameworks with VS.NET 2003

Switching Target Frameworks with VS.NET 2003

Exporting data to a XML file in SQL Server 2005

Exporting data to a XML file in SQL Server 2005

Really Hacking SQL Server 2000

Really Hacking SQL Server 2000

Automating Database maintenance in SQL 2005 Express Edition Part I

Automating Database maintenance in SQL 2005 Express Edition Part I

Office Developer Center: SharePoint Portal Server: Best Practices for Ensuring Application Reusability and Upgrade in Windows SharePoint Services

Office Developer Center: SharePoint Portal Server: Best Practices for Ensuring Application Reusability and Upgrade in Windows SharePoint Services

Lab 15: Managed Code Business Logic in InfoPath 2003

Office Developer Center: Office Code Samples: Lab 15: Managed Code Business Logic in InfoPath 2003

Write Ahead Blog : Download and try the InfoPathBroker sample

Write Ahead Blog : Download and try the InfoPathBroker sample

Download details: InfoPath 2003 Toolkit for Visual Studio .NET

Download details: InfoPath 2003 Toolkit for Visual Studio .NET

XML in SQL Server 2000 and SQLXML

XML in SQL Server 2000 and SQLXML

SQL Server 2005 Express Edition Overview

SQL Server 2005 Express Edition Overview

Tuesday, July 05, 2005