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Showing posts from 2007

SQL Q&A: Inside Clustering, Mysterious Hangs, the SA Account, and More -- TechNet Magazine, July 2007

Are you upgrading from SQL Server 2000 to SQL Server 2005? If so, make sure you run DBCC UPDATEUSAGE right after your databases are upgraded.DBCC UPDATEUSAGE reports and corrects pages and row count inaccuracies in the catalog views. These inaccuracies need to be corrected because they may cause incorrect space usage reports to be returned by the sp_spaceused system stored procedure. In SQL Server 2005, these values are always maintained correctly, so these databases should never experience incorrect counts. However, databases upgraded to SQL Server 2005 may contain invalid counts, so you should run DBCC UPDATEUSAGE after upgrading. Here's how DBCC UPDATEUSAGE works. It corrects the rows, used pages, reserved pages, leaf pages, and data page counts for each partition in a table or index. If there are no inaccuracies in the system tables, DBCC UPDATEUSAGE returns no data. If inaccuracies are found and corrected and you have not used WITH NO_INFOMSGS, DBCC UPDATEUSAGE returns the ro…

Clint Covington: Software design, Microsoft Office Access : Resume best practices revealed

I could make the claim that this guy is way too biased about what he says and only said all that to boost his wife's business. Trust me guys, at the end of the day all that matters really is how much skilled you are. Hey, you could get the job with those flashy cover letters and resumes, but honestly, if you don't know jack about the job, you would be switching to something else soon.Link to Clint Covington: Software design, Microsoft Office Access : Resume best practices revealed

Rico Mariani's Performance Tidbits : Performance Quiz #1 (of a series?)

Recently there was a discussion on one of our internal email aliases in which this problem came up. I though it was an interesting problem so I posed this Quiz to assorted people I work with to see what kinds of things they would say. Considering these three options: Option 1: sw.WriteLine(subject + ": " + message);Option 2: sw.WriteLine("{0}: {1}", subject, message);Option 3: sw.Write(subject);
sw.Write(": ");
sw.WriteLine(message);Answer these questions: Q1. Which of these choices offers the best performance?
Q2: Can you characterize the memory usage of each of these?
Q3: Which would the performance team generally recommend, and why?
Q4: What special factors might alter this recommendation?
Q5: What did you have do assume about "sw" to answer the question? For answers check the link below:Link to Rico Mariani's Performance Tidbits : Performance Quiz #1 (of a series?)

C# LINQ to SQL Chat Dec 12, 2006 - DLINQ - Microsoft O/R Mapper

What is the key difference between ADO.NET Entities and LINQ 2 SQL?A: LINQ to SQL is an ORM over your relational database schema plus some mappings. LINQ to Entities is an ORM over a conceptual object-less model (ERM) that is a mapping over your relational database schema.Source: C# LINQ to SQL Chat Dec 12, 2006 - DLINQ - Microsoft O/R Mapper

Derik Whittaker : Writing Unit Tests, a simple multi-step process to getting started

Derik Whittake describes how to write tests for projects that have "so much existing code".Steps include:Survey your code base.Create an action plan.Execute your action plan.Reflect on what you have accomplished.Start the process over.For more insight into these steps hear over to:Link to Derik Whittaker : Writing Unit Tests, a simple multi-step process to getting started

Books list for Developers

Great list of books every developer should read.

“Software Engineering Code of Ethics and Professionalism,” ACM/IEEE-CS
Software Project Survival Guide, Steve McConnell
Mastering the Requirements Process, Robertson and Robertson
Mythical Man-Month, Fred Brooks
Peopleware, DeMarco and Lister
Rapid Development, Steve McConnell
201 Principles of Software Development, Alan Davis
Code Complete, Steve McConnell
Applying UML & Patterns 2nd Ed, Craig Larman
Programming Pearls 2nd Edition, Jon Bentley
Refactoring, Martin Fowler
Writing Effective Use Cases, Cockburn
Object Oriented Analysis and Design, Grady Booch
Design Patterns, Erich Gamma et al
Conceptual Blockbusting, James Adams
“The Humble Programmer,” Edsger Dijkstra